Lets talk about how to get a good logo designed

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Have you craved in getting a good logo designed by yourself? This article is a guide and I guess it will be found helpful and you can refer your friends too. Because of the trend in the world that everything is going digital makes more firms and new businesses to demand a good logo as a means of advertising their products to the masses. Having a knowledge of how to get a good logo designed will be helpful in your career as virtually all we do require us selling what we do.

Immediately you settle on an idea (or a handful of ideas) and go to the computer to begin your first sketch, starts with a circle, square, or triangle and develop from there (hexagons may also be permissible). Even if the shape you are attempting to get seems to have no real resemblance to any of these shapes, start with one of them anyway. Cut away or combine these geometric shapes until you archive something that is workable.

A related method may be used to typeface logos. You won’t be starting with geometric shapes, but try and see the letterforms as shapes and pay great attention to how they conform with each other.

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The result may not (and often shouldn’t) look like you started with a circle, square, or triangle, but your brain knows. And similarly, your client’s brain will be aware and their customer’s brain will also be aware. For a few reasons, the brain will almost always be aesthetically satisfied with a design based on geometry. It has visual balance and is freely processed because those three basic shapes are so familiar and rudimentary.

This technique also has some added advantage:
i. It’s an easier way to go about translating concepts to the computer. I’m so sure Inkscape makes creating circles, triangles and squares so easy (I’m sorry, I’m only conversant with Illustrator).
ii. This will continuously keep your designs much cleaner and consistent. Curves will be smoother and corners will have the right shapes.
iii. Your designs have a greater opportunity of fitting into the Fibonacci spiral, which is the pinnacle of visual aesthetics.

Twitter’s logo is a great example of all I’ve been saying:

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